TEA REVIEWS: Five teas available at Wan Ling Tea House

Wan Ling Tea House

Website: Wan Ling Tea House
Twitter: @wanlingtea
Facebook: Wan Ling Tea House
Blog: Tea Articles
Company location: Blandford St. Mary, Dorset, UK / Shanghai, China / Woolongong, Australia

Last month it was my pleasure to be in contact with James at Wan Ling Tea House about reviewing some teas. Wan Ling Tea House is a global tea company that has tea houses in China and Australia, as well as trades online in the UK. One of Wan Ling’s company objectives is bring tea drinkers together from all over the world by sell top-quality loose leaf and by providing information about tea and tea cultures. Wan Ling Tea House has online tea articles and runs tea events and tea classes to get the word out.

Wan Ling’s online shop has an extensive collection of tea pots, cups, trays, sets, accessories and loose leaf teas. Whilst all Wan Ling’s teas are impressive, you should not miss out on trying some of its Tie Guan Yin oolong teas, which are specially selected and bought from tea farmers in  AnXi county, Fujian province, China. Today I am reviewing four of Wan Lin’s Tie Guan Yin oolong teas and one Yunnan black tea.

YunNan Gold / Dian Hong Black Tea (2013)
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YunNan Gold / Dian Hong Black Tea was harvested in 2013 in Yunnan province. This tea won Wan Ling Tea House two stars in the 2014 Great Taste awards.

The dry leaf of YunNan Gold / Dian Hong Black Tea consists of long, full-sized needles, many of which are covered in golden tips. The tea cups out a light amber liquor, and the wet leaf has sweet, blackberry-like notes, with some malty and cocoa undertones, whilst the liquor has spicy, peppery and clove-like notes. The flavour of this medium-bodied tea is not short on layers of flavours or complexity. This tea can be infused four to six times, and whilst working through the infusions, peppery, malty, cocoa, honey and almond flavours come through. After the third infusion, the liquor becomes sweeter and the almond notes are very noticeable.

Water temperature: 90 to 95C / 194 to 203F
Water quantity: 225ml / 7.6oz (USA)
Tea quantity: 3g / .11oz
Infusion times: 2m, 2m 30s, 3m, 3m 30s, 4m
Infusions possible: 4 to 6
Teaware used: Glass teapot

Retail price: 50g for £8

 

Traditional Tie Guan Yin – Heavy Oxidise (2012)
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Traditional Tie Guan Yin – Heavy Oxidise was harvested in XiangHua, AnXi county, Fujian, China in the spring of 2012.  This tea was oxidised approximately 70 to 80%  and wood charcoal fired.

The dry leaf of Traditional Tie Guan Yin consists of rolled dark brown leaves that have a sweet, honey aroma, with subtle toasted undertones.  The tea cups out a light golden liquor with peachy notes. The wet leaf also has this peachy aroma, whilst the liquor aroma has charcoal notes. Within the liquor, there are woody, tobacco, honey and peach notes. The liquor has a silky mouthfeel and is warming in the stomach. After the third or fourth infusion, the liquor has a syrup-like consistency that coats the throat.

Water temperature: 90C / 194F
Water quantity: 200ml / 6.7oz (USA)
Tea quantity: 3g / .11oz
Infusion times: 20s wash, 45s, 1m, 1m 30s, 2m, 2m 30s
Infusions possible: 4 to 6
Teaware used: Porcelain gaiwan

Retail price: 50g for £10

 

Zheng Chao Guan Yin Wang (Autumn 2014)
IMG_8483

Zheng Chao Guan Yin Wang was harvested in October 2014 in XiangHua region, AnXi County, Fujian, China. This tea won Wan Ling Tea House two stars in the 2015 Great Taste awards.

This tea cups out a light green, almost transparent, liquor. The wet leaf aroma has floral and sweet notes. The liquor has a medium body and layers of floral and sweet flavours, such as lilac, lavender, honey, banana and buttery notes. Zheng Chao Guan Yin Wang has a thick mouthfeel that gives it a lingering aftertaste.

Water temperature: 85 to 90C / 185 to 194F
Water quantity: 200ml / 6.7oz (USA)
Tea quantity: 3g / .11oz
Infusion times: 20s wash, 30s, 1m, 1m 30s, 2m, 2m 30s
Infusions possible: 5 to 7
Teaware used: Porcelain gaiwan

Retail price: 56g for £16

 

Jiu Jiu Jiu Guan Yin (Spring 2015)
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Harvested in May 2015 in AnXi Xiang Hua, FuJian, China,  Jiu Jiu Jiu Guan Yin cups out a light green that has a strong lilac aroma. Jiu Jiu Jiu Guan Yin is not short on body or flavour – lilac, creamy, tropical fruits and buttery notes are all detectable in the liquor. Although the tea is refreshing, it has a slightly thick mouthfeel and is warming in the stomach.

Water temperature:  85 to 90C / 185 to 194F
Water quantity: 200ml / 6.7oz (USA)
Tea quantity: 3g / .11oz
Infusion times: 20s wash, 30s, 1m, 1m 30s, 2m, 2m 30s
Infusions possible: At least 6
Teaware used: Porcelain gaiwan

Retail price: 56g for £18

 

HongXin TeChun GuanYin Wang (Spring 2015)
IMG_8574

HongXin TeChun GuanYin Wang was harvested in May 2015 in the XiangHua region, AnXi County, Fujian, China.

This tea cups out a very light green liquor. It has a clean mouthfeel and is light in body – although that doesn’t mean light in flavour. After the third infusion, the leaves unravel and put a lot of hum on the gum. A strong lilac flavour is most noticeable, and it provides an intense aroma and aftertaste.

Water temperature:  85 to 90C / 185 to 194F
Water quantity: 200ml / 6.7oz (USA)
Tea quantity: 3g / .11oz
Infusion times: 20s wash, 30s, 1m, 1m 30s, 2m, 2m 30s
Infusions possible: 4 to 6
Teaware used: Porcelain gaiwan

Retail price: 56g for £38

 

Conclusions

Not all oolongs are created equally, and that is clearly seen here. I was especially impressed by the three green oolongs. They are loaded with flavour, aroma and able to withstand numerous infusions. My favourite tea is the Jiu Jiu Jiu Guan Yin. I love its body, intense lilac flavour and warming effect in the stomach. HongXin TeChun GuanYin Wang has similar flavours, but not the body. And Zheng Chao Guan Yin Wang struck me as the most complex of the teas. The combination of floral and sweet notes is definitely a winner.

I was also impressed by Traditional Tie Guan Yin and YunNan Gold / Dian Hong Black. Both teas have the classic notes that make them special. The combination of sweet and roasted flavours in the Traditional Tie Guan Yin make it a tea that you want to sip on all day for warmth and well-being. And the notes in the YunNan Gold are very refined, giving this tea a top-quality sweetness and maltiness.

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About teaxplorer

I grew up in the Midwest of the US and was introduced to tea at a very young age - unsweetened iced tea, that is! It was not until my early 20s, when I was seeking a lighter alternative to coffee, that I took tea drinking to a new level. I still remember my mother suggesting that I try putting milk in a cup of black tea (something that actually sounded a bit repulsive at the time, but I gave it a go). I quickly became tired of supermarket tea and started ordering teas from shops and companies all over the US. Throughout my 20s and now into my early 30s, pursuits in higher education studies, work opportunities and marriage have given me opportunities to live in the UK, Canada and Germany and travel around the world, which has sparked an even greater interest in tea and the culture of tea. This blog is my outlet to discuss my love of tea and show off some of my photos. All images and opinions on this blog are my own, unless stated otherwise. I retain copyright on all photographs, but please do not hesitate to contact me at teaxplorer@gmail.com if you wish to reproduce any of my images. Likewise, if you would like me to review and photograph any teas for you, please get in touch. I would be happy to hear from you. Thank you for stopping by my blog, and I hope you return many times! Happy drinking! Drew B (@teaxplorer)
This entry was posted in Chinese black tea, Chinese oolong, Wan Ling Tea House, Yunnan (black tea) and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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