REVIEW: Teasenz – Chocolate Pu Erh Tea Bar (2008)

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Tea and origin: Puerh tea from the Wayao Village in Yunnan province, China
Twitter: Teasenz
Facebook: Teasenz
Link to Chocolate Pu Erh Tea Bar

Before you run away because you don’t like flavoured tea, this tea isn’t a chocolate-flavoured puerh – it is just pressed into a cake that looks like a chocolate bar. Phew, hopefully I kept you, and you read on to see what I think about this 2008 ripe puerh.

Tasting notes

Dry leaf: The puerh is pressed into a chocolate bar-shaped cake. It is an 80-gram cake. Each square of tea in the cake weighs approximately four to five grams. The cake has a light earthy aroma

Infused tea: The first infusion cups out a rosé wine-coloured liquor. At this stage, it is a light-bodied tea with an earthy body and sweet, chocolate-like finish. The second infusion cups out a slightly darker liquor that has more body and the earthy notes are stronger. Infusion three, four and five cup out a liquor that is as dark as coffee. It is a full-bodied tea at this stage. The earthy notes are strong, but the liquor has a subtle sweet aroma and flavour. The liquor also has a pronounced silky mouthfeel

Infusion tips: You can prepare this western style or gong fu style. For western style, infusion the tea two to three minutes in your tea vessel of choice with 100C water. I would suggest gong fu style because you can experience the development of the aroma and flavours as you work your way through each infusion. You will get six to 1o infusions using gong fu style

Conclusions: I like a lot of things about this puerh. I am not the most knowledgeable or seasoned puerh drinker, but I think the ageing of this puerh has done some great things for its aroma and flavour. Its sweet, chocolatey aroma and finish, and its silky liquor are real winners in my book. The tea also has a powerful caffeine kick, which makes it an ideal breakfast tea. Lastly, the cake pressed into chocolate bar shape not only looks fun, but it is also very convenient. You just break off a piece – there is no fussing around with a puerh knife, and the little pieces from the chocolate bar cake taste much better than a mini tuo cha, but are just as convenient. I think this would be a great tea for someone new to puerh. I would never suggest giving someone a really young ripe puerh. The ageing process in this 2008 puerh has mellowed the flavour

Retail price: One cake for $11.95 / two cakes for $10.95 each / five cakes for $9.95 each

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Packaging

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Wrapped cake

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Back side of cake

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About teaxplorer

I grew up in the Midwest of the US and was introduced to tea at a very young age - unsweetened iced tea, that is! It was not until my early 20s, when I was seeking a lighter alternative to coffee, that I took tea drinking to a new level. I still remember my mother suggesting that I try putting milk in a cup of black tea (something that actually sounded a bit repulsive at the time, but I gave it a go). I quickly became tired of supermarket tea and started ordering teas from shops and companies all over the US. Throughout my 20s and now into my early 30s, pursuits in higher education studies, work opportunities and marriage have given me opportunities to live in the UK, Canada and Germany and travel around the world, which has sparked an even greater interest in tea and the culture of tea. This blog is my outlet to discuss my love of tea and show off some of my photos. All images and opinions on this blog are my own, unless stated otherwise. I retain copyright on all photographs, but please do not hesitate to contact me at teaxplorer@gmail.com if you wish to reproduce any of my images. Likewise, if you would like me to review and photograph any teas for you, please get in touch. I would be happy to hear from you. Thank you for stopping by my blog, and I hope you return many times! Happy drinking! Drew B (@teaxplorer)
This entry was posted in Cooked Puerh (Shou), Puerh, Teasenz, Yunnan (Puerh) and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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